TED

TEDx talk under review

Updated June 20, 2018: An independently organized TEDx event recently posted, and subsequently removed, a talk from the TEDx YouTube channel that the event organizer titled: “Why our perception of pedophilia has to change.”

In the TEDx talk, a speaker described pedophilia as a condition some people are born with, and suggested that if we recognize it as such, we can do more to prevent those people from acting on their instincts.

TEDx events are organized independently from the main annual TED conference, with some 3,500 events held every year in more than 100 countries. Our nonprofit TED organization does not control TEDx events’ content.

This talk and its removal was recently brought to our attention. After reviewing the talk, we believe it cites research in ways that are open to serious misinterpretation. This led some viewers to interpret the talk as an argument in favor of an illegal and harmful practice.

Furthermore, after contacting the organizer to understand why it had been taken down, we learned that the speaker herself requested it be removed from the internet because she had serious concerns about her own safety in its wake.

Our policy is and always has been to remove speakers’ talks when they request we do so. That is why we support this TEDx organizer’s decision to respect this speaker’s wishes and keep the talk offline.

We will continue to take down any illegal copies of the talk posted on the Internet.

Original, posted June 19, 2018: An independently organized TEDx event recently posted, and subsequently removed, a talk from the TEDx YouTube channel that the event organizer had titled: “Why our perception of pedophilia has to change.”
We were not aware of this organizer’s actions, but understand now that their decision to remove the talk was at the speaker’s request for her safety.
In our review of the talk in question, we at TED believe it cites research open for serious misinterpretation.
TED does not support or advocate for pedophilia.
We are now reviewing the talk to determine how to move forward.
Until we can review this talk for potential harm to viewers, we are taking down any illegal copies of the talk posted on the Internet.  

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12 books from favorite TEDWomen speakers, for your summer reading list

We all have a story to tell. And in my work as curator of the TEDWomen conference, I’ve had the pleasure of providing a platform to some of the best stories and storytellers out there. Beyond their TED Talk, of course, many TEDWomen speakers are also accomplished authors — and if you liked them on the TED stage, odds are you will enjoy spending more time with them in the pages of their books.

All of the women and men listed here have given talks at TEDWomen, though some talks are related to their books and some aren’t. See what connects with you and enjoy your summer!

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Luvvie Ajayi‘s 2017 TEDWomen talk has already amassed over 2.2 million views online! In it, she talks about how she wants to leave this world better than she found it and in order to do that, she says we all have to get more comfortable saying the sometimes uncomfortable things that need to be said. What’s great about Luvvie is that she delivers her commentary with a sly side eye that pokes fun at everyone, including herself.

In her book, I’m Judging You: The Do-Better Manual — written in the form of an Emily Post-type guidebook for modern manners — Luvvie doles out criticism and advice with equal amounts of wit, charm and humor that’s often laugh-out-loud funny. As Shonda Rhimes noted in her review, “This truth-riot of a book gives us everything from hilarious lectures on the bad behavior all around us to razor sharp essays on media and culture. With I’m Judging You, Luvvie brilliantly puts the world on notice that she is not here for your foolishness — or mine.”

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At the first TEDWomen in 2010, Madeleine Albright talked to me about what it was like to be a woman and a diplomat. In her new book, entitled Fascism: A Warning, the former secretary of state writes about the history of fascism and the clash that took place between two ideologies of governing: fascism and democracy. She argues that “fascism not only endured the 20th century, but now presents a more virulent threat to peace and justice than at any time since the end of World War II.”

“At a moment when the question ‘Is this how it begins?’ haunts Western democracies,” the Economist notes in its review, “[Albright] writes with rare authority.”

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Sometimes a talk perfectly captures the zeitgeist, and that was the case with Gretchen Carlson last November at TEDWomen. At the time, the #MeToo movement founded in 2007 by Tarana Burke was seeing a huge surge online, thanks to signal-boosting from Alyssa Milano and more women with stories to share.

Carlson took to the stage to talk about her personal experience with sexual harassment at Fox News, her historic lawsuit and the lessons she’d learned and related in her just-released book, Be Fierce. In her talk, she identifies three specific things we can all do to create safer places to work. “We will no longer be underestimated, intimidated or set back,” Carlson says. “We will stand up and speak up and have our voices heard. We will be the women we were meant to be.” In her book, she writes in detail about how we can stop harassment and take our power back.

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John Cary is an architect who thinks deeply about diversity in design — and how the field’s lack of diversity leads to thoughtless, compassionless spaces in the modern world. As he said in his 2017 TEDWomen talk, “well-designed spaces are not just a matter of taste or a questions of aesthetics. They literally shape our ideas about who we are in the world and what we deserve.”

For years, as the executive director of Public Architecture, John has advocated for the term “public interest design” to become part of the architect’s lexicon, in much the same way as it is in fields like law and health care. In his new book, Design for Good, John presents 20 building projects from around the world that exemplify how good design can improve communities, the environment, and the lives of the people who live with it.

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In her thought-provoking 2016 TEDWomen talk, professor Brittney Cooper examined racism through the lens of time — showing how moments of joy, connection and well-being had been lost to people of color because of delays in social progress.

Last summer, I recommended Brittney’s book on the lives and thoughts of intellectual Black women in history who had been left out of textbooks. And this year, Brittney is back with another book, one that is more personal and also very timely in this election year in which women are figuring out what a truly intersectional feminist movement looks like.

As my friend Jane Fonda wrote in a recent blog post, in order to build truly multi-racial coalitions, white people need to do the work to truly understand race and racism. For white feminists in particular, the work starts by listening to the perspectives of women of color. Brittney’s book, Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower, offers just that opportunity. Brittney’s sharp observations from high school (at a predominantly white school), college (at Howard University) and as a 30-something professional make the political personal. As she told the Washington Post, “When we figure out politics at a personal level, then perhaps it wouldn’t be so hard to figure it out at the more structural level.”

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Susan David is a Harvard Medical School psychologist who studies how we process our emotions. In a deeply moving talk at TEDWomen 2017, Susan suggested that the way we deal with our emotions shapes everything that matters: our actions, careers, relationships, health and happiness. “I’m not anti-happiness. I like being happy. I’m a pretty happy person,” she says. “But when we push aside normal emotions to embrace false positivity, we lose our capacity to develop skills to deal with the world as it is, not as we wish it to be.”

In her book, Emotional Agility, Susan shares strategies for the radical acceptance of all of our emotions. How do we not let our self-doubts, failings, shame, fear, or anger hold us back?

“We own our emotions,” she says. “They don’t own us.”

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Dr. Musimbi Kanyoro is president and CEO of Global Fund for Women, one of the world’s leading publicly supported foundations for gender equality. In her TEDWomen talk last year, she introduced us to the Maragoli concept of “isirika” — a pragmatic way of life that embraces the mutual responsibility to care for one another — something she sees women practicing all over the world.

In All the Women in My Family Sing, Musimbi is one of 69 women of color who have contributed prose and poetry to this “moving anthology” that “illuminates the struggles, traditions, and life views of women at the dawn of the 21st century. The authors grapple with identity, belonging, self-esteem, and sexuality, among other topics.” Contributors range in age from 16 to 77 and represent African-American, Native American, Asian-American, Muslim, Cameroonian, Kenyan, Liberian, Mexican-American, Korean, Chinese-American and LGBTQI experiences.

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In her 2017 TEDWomen talk, author Anjali Kumar shared some of what she learned in researching her new book, Stalking God: My Unorthodox Search for Something to Believe In. A few years ago, Anjali — a pragmatic lawyer for Google who, like more than 56 million of her fellow Americans, describes herself as not religious — set off on a mission to find God.

Spoiler alert: She failed. But along the way, she learned a lot about spirituality, humanity and what binds us all together as human beings.

In her humorous and thoughtful book, Anjali writes about her search for answers to life’s most fundamental questions and finding a path to spirituality in our fragmented world. The good news is that we have a lot more in common than we might think.

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New York Times best-selling author Peggy Orenstein is out with a new collection of essays titled Don’t Call Me Princess: Girls, Women, Sex and Life. Peggy combines a unique blend of investigative reporting, personal revelation and unexpected humor in her many books, including Schoolgirls and the book that was the subject of her 2016 TEDWomen talk, Girls & Sex.

Don’t Call Me Princess “offers a crucial evaluation of where we stand today as women — in our work lives, sex lives, as mothers, as partners — illuminating both how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go.” Don’t miss it.

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Caroline Paul began her remarkable career as the first female firefighter in San Francisco. She wrote about that in her first book, Fighting Fires. In the 20 years since, she’s written many more books, including her most recent, You Are Mighty: A Guide to Changing the World.

This well-timed book offers advice and inspiration to young activists. She writes about the experiences of young people — from famous kids like Malala Yousafzai and Claudette Colvin to everyday kids — who stood up for what they thought was right and made a difference in their communities. Paul offers loads of tactics for young people to use in their own activism — and proves you’re never too young to change the world.

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I first encountered Cleo Wade‘s delightful, heartfelt words of wisdom like most people, on Instagram. Cleo has over 350,000 followers on her popular feed that features short poems, bits of wisdom and pics. Cleo has been called the poet of her generationeverybody’s BFF and the millennial Oprah. In her new poetry collection, Heart Talk: Poetic Wisdom for a Better Life, the poet, artist and activist shares some of the Instagram notes she wrote “while sitting in her apartment, poems about loving, being and healing” and “the type of good ol’-fashioned heartfelt advice I would share with you if we were sitting in my home at my kitchen table.”

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In 1994, the Rwandan Civil War forced six-year-old Clemantine Wamariya and her fifteen-year-old sister from their home in Kigali, leaving their parents and everything they knew behind. In her 2017 TEDWomen talk, Clemantine shared some of her experiences over the next six years growing up while living in refugee camps and migrating through seven African countries.

In her new memoir, The Girl Who Smiled Beads: A Story of War and What Comes After, Clemantine recounts her harrowing story of hunger, imprisonment, and not knowing whether her parents were alive or dead. At the age of 12, she moved to Chicago and was raised in part by an American family. It’s an incredible, poignant story and one that is so important during this time when many are denying the humanity of people who are victims of war and civil unrest. For her part, Clemantine remains hopeful. “There are a lot of great people everywhere,” she told the Washington Post. “And there are also a lot of not-so-great people. It’s all over the world. But when we stepped out of the airplane, we had people waiting for us — smiling, saying, ‘Welcome to America.’ People were happy. Many countries were not happy to have us. Right now there are people at the airport still holding those banners.”

TEDWOMEN 2018

I also want to mention that registration for TEDWomen 2018 is open now! Space is limited and I don’t want you to miss out. This year, TEDWomen will be held Nov. 28–30 in Palm Springs, California. The theme is Showing Up.

The time for silent acceptance of the status quo is over. Women around the world are taking matters into their own hands, showing up for each other and themselves to shape the future we all want to see.We’ll explore the many aspects of this year’s theme through curated TED Talks, community dinners and activities.

Join us!

— Pat

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An ambitious plan to explore our oceans, and more news from TED speakers

 

The past few weeks have brimmed over with TED-related news. Below, some highlights.

Exploring the ocean like never before. A school of ocean-loving TED speakers have teamed up to launch OceanX, an international initiative dedicated to discovering more of our oceans in an effort to “inspire a human connection to the sea.” The coalition is supported by Bridgewater Capital’s Ray Dalio, along with luminaries like ocean explorer Sylvia Earle and filmmaker James Cameron, and partners such as BBC Studios, the American Museum of Natural History and the National Geographic Society. The coalition is now looking for ideas for scientific research missions in 2019, exploring the Norwegian Sea and the Indian Ocean. Dalio’s son Mark leads the media arm of the venture; from virtual reality demonstrations in classrooms to film and TV releases like the BBC show Blue Planet II and its follow-up film Oceans: Our Blue Planet, OceanX plans to build an engaged global community that seeks to “enjoy, understand and protect our oceans.” (Watch Dalio’s TED Talk, Earle’s TED Talk and Cameron’s TED Talk.)

The Ebola vaccine that’s saving lives. In response to the recent Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, GAVI — the Vaccine Alliance, led by Seth Berkeley — has deployed thousands of experimental vaccines in an outbreak control strategy. The vaccines were produced as part of a partnership between GAVI and Merck, a pharmaceutical company, committed to proactively developing and producing vaccines in case of a future Ebola epidemic. In his TED Talk, Berkeley spoke of the drastic dangers of global disease and the preventative measures necessary to ensure we are prepared for future outbreaks. (Watch his TED Talk and read our in-depth interview with Berkeley.)

A fascinating new study on the halo effect. Does knowing someone’s political leanings change how you gauge their skills? Cognitive neurologist Tali Sharot and lawyer Cass R. Sunstein shared insights from their latest research answering the question in The New York Times. Alongside a team from University College London and Harvard Law School, Sharot conducted an experiment testing whether knowing someone’s political leanings affected how we would engage and trust in other non-political aspects of their lives. The study found that people were more willing to trust someone who had the same political beliefs as them — even in completely unrelated fields, like dentistry or architecture. These findings have wide-reaching implications and can further our understanding of the social and political landscape. (Watch Sharot’s TED Talk on optimism bias).

A new essay anthology on rape culture. Roxane Gay’s newest book, Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture, was released in May to critical and commercial acclaim. The essay collection, edited and introduced by Gay, features first-person narratives on the realities and effects of harassment, assault and rape. With essays from 29 contributors, including actors Gabrielle Union and Amy Jo Burns, and writers Claire Schwartz and Lynn Melnick, Not That Bad offers feminist insights into the national and global dialogue on sexual violence. (Watch Gay’s TED Talk.)

One million pairs of 3D-printed sneakers. At TED2015, Carbon founder and CEO Joseph DeSimone displayed the latest 3D printing technology, explaining its seemingly endless applications for reshaping the future of manufacturing. Now, Carbon has partnered with Adidas for a bold new vision to 3D-print 100,000 pairs of sneakers by the end of 2018, with plans to ramp up production to millions. The company’s “Digital Light Synthesis” technique, which uses light and oxygen to fabricate materials from pools of resin, significantly streamlines manufacturing from traditional 3D-printing processes — a technology Adidas considers “revolutionary.” (Watch DeSimone’s TED Talk.)

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Ideas from the intersections: A night of talks from TED and Brightline

Onstage to host the event, Corey Hajim, TED’s business curator, and Cloe Shasha, TED’s speaker development director, kick off TEDNYC Intersections, a night of talks presented by TED and the Brightline Initiative. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED)

At the intersections where we meet and collaborate, we can pool our collective wisdom to seek solutions to the world’s greatest problems. But true change begs for more than incremental steps and passive reactions — we need to galvanize transformation to create our collective future.

To celebrate the effort of bold thinkers building a better world, TED has partnered with the Brightline Initiative, a noncommercial coalition of organizations dedicated to helping leaders turn ideas into reality. In a night of talks at TED HQ in New York City — hosted by TED’s speaker development director Cloe Shasha and co-curated by business curator Corey Hajim and technology curator Alex Moura — six speakers and two performers showed us how we can effect real change. After opening remarks from Brightline’s Ricardo Vargas, the session kicked off with Stanford professor Tina Seelig.

Creativity expert Tina Seelig shares three ways we can all make our own luck. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED)

How to cultivate more luck in your life. “Are you ready to get lucky?” asks Tina Seelig, a professor at Stanford University who focuses on creativity, entrepreneurship and innovation. While luck may seem to be brought on by chance alone, it turns out that there are ways you can enhance it — no matter how lucky or unlucky you think you are. Seelig shares three simple ways you can help luck to bend a little more in your direction: Take small risks that bring you outside your comfort zone; find every opportunity to show appreciation when others help you; and find ways to look at bad or crazy ideas with a new perspective. “The winds of luck are always there,” Seelig says, and by using these three tactics, you can build a bigger and bigger sail to catch them.

A new mantra: let’s fail mindfully. We celebrate bold entrepreneurs whose ingenuity led them to success — but how do we treat those who have failed? Leticia Gasca, founder and director of the Failure Institute, thinks we need to change the way we talk about business failure. After the devastating closing of her own startup, Gasca wiped the experience from her résumé and her mind. But she later realized that by hiding her failure, she was missing out on a valuable opportunity to connect. In an effort to embrace failure as an experience to learn from, Gasca co-created the Failure Institute, which includes international Fuck-Up Nights — spaces for vulnerability and connection over shared experiences of failure. Now, she’s advocates for a more holistic culture around failure. The goal of failing mindfully, Gasca says, is to “be aware of the consequences of the failed business,” and “to be aware of the lessons learned and the responsibility to share those learnings with the world.” This shift in the way we address failure can help make us better entrepreneurs, better people, and yes — better failures.

A police officer for 25 years, Tracie Keesee imagines a future where communities and police co-produce public safety in local communities. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED

Preserving dignity, guaranteeing justice. We all want to be safe, and our safety is intertwined, says Tracie Keesee, cofounder of the Center for Policing Equity. Sharing lessons she’s learned from 25 years as a police officer, Keesee reflects on the challenges — and opportunities — we all have for creating safer communities together. Policies like “Stop, Question and Frisk” set police and neighborhoods as adversaries, creating alienation, specifically among African Americans; instead, Keesee shares a vision for how the police and the neighborhoods they serve can come together to co-produce public safety. One example: the New York City Police Department’s “Build the Block Program,” which helps community members interact with police officers to share their experiences. The co-production of justice also includes implicit bias training for officers — so they can better understand how this biases we all carry impact their decision-making. By ending the “us vs. them” narrative, Keesee says, we can move forward together.

We can all be influencers. ​Success was once defined by power, but today it’s tied to influence, or “the ability to have an effect on a person or outcome,” says behavioral scientist Jon Levy. It rests on two building blocks: who you’re connected to and how much they trust you. In 2010, Levy created “Influencers” dinners, gathering a dozen high-profile people (who are strangers to each other) at his apartment. But how to get them to trust him and the rest of the group? He asks his guests to cook the meal and clean up. “I had a hunch this was working,” Levy recalls, “when one day I walked into my home and 12-time NBA All-Star Isiah Thomas was washing my dishes, while singer Regina Spektor was making guac with the Science Guy himself, Bill Nye.” From the dinners have emerged friendships, professional relationships and support for social causes. He believes we can cultivate our own spheres of influence at a scale that works for us. “If I can encourage you to do anything, it’s to bring together people you admire,” says Levy. “There’s almost no greater joy in life.”

Yelle and GrandMarnier rock the TED stage with electro-pop and a pair of bright yellow jumpsuits. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED)

The intersection of music and dance. All the way from France, Yelle and GrandMarnier grace the TEDNYC stage with two electro-pop hits, “Interpassion” and “Ba$$in.” Both songs groove with robotic beats, Yelle’s hypnotic voice, kaleidoscopic rhythms and hypersonic sounds that rouse the audience to stand up, let loose and dance in the aisles.

How to be a great ally. We’re taught to believe that working hard leads directly to getting what you deserve — but sadly, this isn’t the case for many people. Gender, race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, class and geography — all of these can affect our opportunities for success, says writer and advocate Melinda Epler, and it’s up to all of us to do better as allies. She shares three simple ways to start uplifting others in the workplace: do no harm (listen, apologize for mistakes and never stop learning); advocate for underrepresented people in small ways (intervene if you see them being interrupted); and change the trajectory of a life by mentoring or sponsoring someone through their career. “There is no magic wand that corrects diversity and inclusion,” Epler says. “Change happens one person at a time, one act at a time, one word at a time.”

AJ Jacobs explains the powerful benefits of gratitude — and takes us on his quest to think everyone who made his morning cup of coffee. (Photo: Ryan Lash / TED)

Lessons from the Trail of Gratitude. Author AJ Jacobs embarked on a quest with a deceptively simple idea at its heart: to personally thank every person who helped make his morning cup of coffee. “This quest took me around the world,” Jacobs says. “I discovered that my coffee would not be possible without hundreds of people I take for granted.” His project was inspired by a desire to overcome the brain’s innate “negative bias” — the psychological tendency to focus on the bad over the good — which is most effectively combated with gratitude. Jacobs ended up thanking everyone from his barista and the inventor of his coffee cup lid to the Colombian farmers who grew the coffee beans and the steelworkers in Indiana who made their pickup truck — and more than a thousand others in between. Along the way, he learned a series of perspective-altering lessons about globalization, the importance of human connection and more, which are detailed in his new TED Book, Thanks a Thousand: A Gratitude Journey. “It allowed me to focus on the hundreds of things that go right every day, as opposed to the three or four that go wrong,” Jacobs says of his project. “And it reminded me of the astounding interconnectedness of our world.”

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Resources for suicide prevention, post-attempt survivors and their families

Inspired by JD Schramm’s powerful TEDTalk on surviving a suicide attempt, this list of resources has been updated to help you widen your understanding of mental health, depression, suicide and suicide prevention. Whether you’re an attempt survivor, a concerned family member or friend, or struggling with suicidal thoughts yourself, this list offers helpful resources and hotlines from across the world. This list is not exhaustive so we’d love to hear from you— add suggestions to the comments or email us.

To start off, here is a TED playlist on breaking the silence around suicide.

In the US:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-TALK
http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/
A free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center to you.

The Trevor Project
http://www.thetrevorproject.org/localresources
866 4-U-TREVOR
The Trevor Project is determined to end suicide among LGBTQ youth by providing life-saving and life-affirming resources including a nationwide, 24/7 crisis intervention lifeline, digital community and advocacy/educational programs that create a safe, supportive and positive environment for everyone.

Samaritans USA
http://www.samaritansusa.org/
Samaritans centers provide volunteer-staffed hotlines and professional and volunteer-run public education programs, “suicide survivor” support groups and many other crisis response, outreach and advocacy activities.

Attempt Survivors
http://attemptsurvivors.com/
A two-year project that collected blog posts and stories for and by attempt survivors, set up by the American Association of Suicidology. While the active collection has stopped, the archive is a good place to explore, to hear open, honest voices exploring life after a suicide attempt.

ULifeline
http://ulifeline.org/page/main/StudentLogin.html
An anonymous online resource where you can learn about suicide  prevention and campus-specific resources.

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention:
http://www.afsp.org/
A national nonprofit organization dedicated to understanding and preventing suicide through research, education and advocacy, and to reaching out to people impacted by suicide.

Mental Health First Aid USA
http://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/
A public education program that  helps the public identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

Suicide Awareness Voices of Education
SAVE.org
A national nonprofit dedicated to preventing suicide through public awareness and education.

Live Through This
http://livethroughthis.org/
An organization documenting the stories and portraits of suicide attempt survivors to encourage more open dialogue around suicide and depression.

International:

International Association for Suicide Prevention
http://www.iasp.info/
IASP now includes professionals and volunteers from more than fifty different countries. IASP is a Non-Governmental Organization in official relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO) concerned with suicide prevention.

Befrienders 
A suicide prevention resource with phone helplines across the world.
https://www.befrienders.org/

Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention
A resource for survivors as well as anyone in suicidal distress.
To find the nearest crisis center: https://suicideprevention.ca/need-help/
To find the nearest support group: https://suicideprevention.ca/coping-with-suicide-loss/survivor-support-centres/

SAPTA (Mexico)
http://www.saptel.org.mx/index.html

Centro de Valorização da Vida (Brazil)
http://www.cvv.org.br/
Tel: 188 or 141

Sociedade Portuguesa de Suicidologia (Portugal)
http://www.spsuicidologia.pt/

Hulpmix (Netherlands)
https://www.113.nl/english

Samaritans Onlus (Italy)
http://www.samaritansonlus.org/

The South African Depression and Anxiety Group (South Africa)
http://www.sadag.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=11&Itemid=114

Suicide Ecoute (France)
http://www.suicide-ecoute.fr/

PHARE (France)
http://www.phare.org/

한국자살예방협회 (Korean Association for Suicide Prevention)
http://www.suicideprevention.or.kr/

한국자살협회 사이버 상담실 (Korean Suicide Prevention Cyber Counseling)
http://www.counselling.or.kr/

Hjälplinjen (Sweden)
http://www.hjalplinjen.se/

If you know of good resources available where you live, please add them to the comments section of this post.

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