TED

New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe, and more news from TED speakers

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights.

New clues about the most mysterious star in the universe. KIC 8462852 (often called “Tabby’s star,” after the astronomer Tabetha Boyajian, who led the first study of the star) intermittently dims as much as 22% and then brightens again, for a reason no one has yet quite figured out. This bizarre occurrence led astronomers to propose over a dozen theories for why the star might be dimming, including the fringe theory that it was caused by an alien civilization using the planet’s energy. Now, new data shows that the dimming isn’t fully opaque; certain colors of light are blocked more than others. This suggests that what’s causing the star to dim is dust. After all, if an opaque object — like a planet or alien megastructure — was passing in front of the star, all of the light would be blocked equally. Tabby’s star is due to become visible again in late February or early March of 2018. (Watch Boyajian’s TED Talk)

TED’s new video series celebrates the genius design of everyday objects. What do the hoodie, the London Tube Map, the hyperlink, and the button have in common? They’re everyday objects, often overlooked, that have profoundly influenced the world around us. Each 3- to 4- minute episode of TED’s original video series Small Thing Big Idea celebrates one of these objects, with a well-known name in design explaining what exactly makes it so great. First up is Michael Bierut on the London Tube Map. (Watch the first episode here and tune in weekly on Tuesday for more.)

The science of black holes. In the new PBS special Black Hole Apocalypse, astrophysicist Janna Levin explores the science of black holes, what they are, why they are so powerful and destructive, and what they might tell us about the very origin of our existence. Dubbing them the world’s greatest mystery, Levin and her fellow scientists, including astronomer Andrea Ghez and experimental physicist Rainer Weiss, embark on a journey to portray the magnitude and importance of these voids that were long left unexplored and unexplained. (Watch Levin’s TED Talk, Ghez’s TED Talk, and read Weiss’ Ideas piece.)

An organized crime thriller with non-fiction roots. McMafia, a television show starring James Norton, premiered in the UK in early January. The show is a fictionalized account of Misha Glenny’s 2008 non-fiction book of the same name. The show focuses on Alex Goldman, the son of an exiled Mafia boss who wants to put his family’s history behind him. Unfortunately, a murder foils his plans and to protect his family, he must face up to various international crime syndicates. (Watch Glenny’s TED Talk)

Inside the African-American anti-abortion movement. In her new documentary for PBS’ Frontline, Yoruba Richen examines the complexities of the abortion debate as it relates to US’ racial history. Richen speaks with African-American members of both the pro-life and the anti-abortion movements, as her short doc follows a group of anti-abortion activists as they work in the black community. (Watch Richen’s TED Talk.)

Have a news item to share? Write us at contact@ted.com and you may see it included in this weekly round-up.

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TED debuts “Small Thing Big Idea” original video series on Facebook Watch

Today we’re debuting a new original video series on Facebook Watch called Small Thing Big Idea: Designs That Changed the World.

Each 3- to 4-minute weekly episode takes a brief but delightful look at the lasting genius of one everyday object – a pencil, for example, or a hoodie – and explains how it is so perfectly designed that it’s actually changed the world around it.

The series features some of design’s biggest names, including fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi, museum curator Paola Antonelli, and graphic designer Michael Bierut sharing their infectious obsession with good design.

To watch the first episode of Small Thing Big Idea (about the little-celebrated brilliance of subway maps!), tune in here, and check back every Tuesday for new episodes.

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Why Oprah’s talk works: Insight from a TED speaker coach

By Abigail Tenembaum and Michael Weitz of Virtuozo

When Oprah Winfrey spoke at the Golden Globes last Sunday night, her speech lit up social media within minutes. It was powerful, memorable and somehow exactly what the world wanted to hear. It inspired multiple standing O’s — and even a semi-serious Twitter campaign to elect her president #oprah2020

All this in 9 short minutes.

What made this short talk so impactful? My colleagues and I were curious. We are professional speaker coaches who’ve worked with many, many TED speakers, analyzing their scripts and their presentation styles to help each person make the greatest impact with their idea. And when we sat down and looked at Oprah’s talk, we saw a lot of commonality with great TED Talks.

Among the elements that made this talk so effective:

A strong opening that transports us. Oprah got on stage to give a “thank you” speech for a lifetime achievement award. But she chose not to start with the “thank you.” Instead she starts with a story. Her first words? “In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee.” Just like a great story should, this first sentence transports us to a different time and place, and introduces the protagonist. As TED speaker Uri Hasson says: Our brain loves stories. Oprah’s style of opening signals to the audience that it’s story time, by using the opening similar to any fairy tale: “Once upon a time” (In 1964) “There was a princess” (I was a little girl) “In a land far far away” (…my mother’s house in Milwaukee.”

Alternating between ideas and anecdotes. A great TED Talk illustrates an idea. And, just like Oprah does in her talk, the idea is illustrated through a mix of stories, examples and facts. Oprah tells a few anecdotes, none longer than a minute. But they are masterfully crafted, to give us, the audience, just enough detail to invite us to imagine it. When TED speaker Stefan Larsson tells us an anecdote about his time at medical school, he says: “I wore the white coat” — one concrete detail that allows us, the audience, to imagine a whole scene. Oprah describes Sidney Poitier with similar specificity – down to the detail that “his tie was white.” Recy Taylor was “walking home from a church service.” Oprah the child wasn’t sitting on the floor but on the “linoleum floor.” Like a great sketch artist, a great storyteller draws a few defined lines and lets the audience’s imagination fill in the rest to create the full story.

A real conversation with the audience. At TED, we all know it’s called a TED talk — not “speech,” not “lecture.” We feel it when Sir Ken Robinson looks at the audience and waits for their reaction. But it’s mostly not in the words. It’s in the tone, in the fact that the speaker’s attention is on the audience, focusing on one person at a time, and having a mini conversation with us. Oprah is no different. She speaks to the people in the room, and this intimacy translates beautifully on camera.

It’s Oprah’s talk — and only Oprah’s. A great TED talk, just like any great talk or speech, is deeply connected to the person delivering it. We like to ask speakers, “What makes this a talk that only you can give?” Esther Perel shares anecdotes from her unique experience as a couples therapist, intimate stories that helped her develop a personal perspective on love and fidelity. Only Ray Dalio could tell the story of personal failure and rebuilding that lies behind the radical transparency he’s created in his company. Uri Hasson connects his research on the brain and stories to his own love of film. Oprah starts with the clearest personal angle – her personal story. And along her speech she brings her own career as an example, and her own way of articulating her message.

A great TED Talk invites the audience to think and to feel. Oprah’s ending is a big invitation to the audience to act. And it’s done not by telling us what to do, but by offering an optimistic vision of the future and inviting us all to be part of it.

Here’s a link to the full speech.

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Meet the 2018 class of TED Fellows and Senior Fellows

The TED Fellows program is excited to announce the new group of TED2018 Fellows and Senior Fellows.

Representing a wide range of disciplines and countries — including, for the first time in the program, Syria, Thailand and Ukraine — this year’s TED Fellows are rising stars in their fields, each with a bold, original approach to addressing today’s most complex challenges and capturing the truth of our humanity. Members of the new Fellows class include a journalist fighting fake news in her native Ukraine; a Thai landscape architect designing public spaces to protect vulnerable communities from climate change; an American attorney using legal assistance and policy advocacy to bring justice to survivors of campus sexual violence; a regenerative tissue engineer harnessing the body’s immune system to more quickly heal wounds; a multidisciplinary artist probing the legacy of slavery in the US; and many more.

The TED Fellows program supports extraordinary, iconoclastic individuals at work on world-changing projects, providing them with access to the global TED platform and community, as well as new tools and resources to amplify their remarkable vision. The TED Fellows program now includes 453 Fellows who work across 96 countries, forming a powerful, far-reaching network of artists, scientists, doctors, activists, entrepreneurs, inventors, journalists and beyond, each dedicated to making our world better and more equitable. Read more about their visionary work on the TED Fellows blog.

Below, meet the group of Fellows and Senior Fellows who will join us at TED2018, April 10–14, in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Antionette Carroll
Antionette Carroll (USA)
Social entrepreneur + designer
Designer and founder of Creative Reaction Lab, a nonprofit using design to foster racially equitable communities through education and training programs, community engagement consulting and open-source tools and resources.


Psychiatrist Essam Daod comforts a Syrian refugee as she arrives ashore at the Greek island of Lesvos. His organization Humanity Crew provides psychological aid to refugees and recently displaced populations. (Photo: Laurence Geai)

Essam Daod
Essam Daod (Palestine | Israel)
Mental health specialist
Psychiatrist and co-founder of Humanity Crew, an NGO providing psychological aid and first-response mental health interventions to refugees and displaced populations.


Laura L. Dunn
Laura L. Dunn (USA)
Victims’ rights attorney
Attorney and Founder of SurvJustice, a national nonprofit increasing the prospect of justice for survivors of campus sexual violence through legal assistance, policy advocacy and institutional training.


Rola Hallam
Rola Hallam (Syria | UK)
Humanitarian aid entrepreneur 
Medical doctor and founder of CanDo, a social enterprise and crowdfunding platform that enables local humanitarians to provide healthcare to their own war-devastated communities.


Olga Iurkova
Olga Iurkova (Ukraine)
Journalist + editor
Journalist and co-founder of StopFake.org, an independent Ukrainian organization that trains an international cohort of fact-checkers in an effort to curb propaganda and misinformation in the media.


Glaciologist M Jackson studies glaciers like this one — the glacier Svínafellsjökull in southeastern Iceland. The high-water mark visible on the mountainside indicates how thick the glacier once was, before climate change caused its rapid recession. (Photo: M Jackson)

M Jackson
M Jackson (USA)
Geographer + glaciologist
Glaciologist researching the cultural and social impacts of climate change on communities across all eight circumpolar nations, and an advocate for more inclusive practices in the field of glaciology.


Romain Lacombe
Romain Lacombe (France)
Environmental entrepreneur
Founder of Plume Labs, a company dedicated to raising awareness about global air pollution by creating a personal electronic pollution tracker that forecasts air quality levels in real time.


Saran Kaba Jones
Saran Kaba Jones (Liberia | USA)
Clean water advocate
Founder and CEO of FACE Africa, an NGO that strengthens clean water and sanitation infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa through innovative community support services.


Yasin Kakande
Yasin Kakande (Uganda)
Investigative journalist + author
Journalist working undercover in the Middle East to expose the human rights abuses of migrant workers there.


In one of her long-term projects, “The Three: Senior Love Triangle,” documentary photographer Isadora Kosofsky shadowed a three-way relationship between aged individuals in Los Angeles, CA – Jeanie (81), Will (84), and Adina (90). Here, Jeanie and Will kiss one day after a fight.

Isadora Kosofsky
Isadora Kosofsky (USA)
Photojournalist + filmmaker
Photojournalist exploring underrepresented communities in America with an immersive approach, documenting senior citizen communities, developmentally disabled populations, incarcerated youth, and beyond.


Adam Kucharski
Adam Kucharski (UK)
Infectious disease scientist
Infectious disease scientist creating new mathematical and computational approaches to understand how epidemics like Zika and Ebola spread, and how they can be controlled.


Lucy Marcil
Lucy Marcil (USA)
Pediatrician + social entrepreneur
Pediatrician and co-founder of StreetCred, a nonprofit addressing the health impact of financial stress by providing fiscal services to low-income families in the doctor’s waiting room.


Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil
Burçin Mutlu-Pakdil (Turkey | USA)
Astrophysicist
Astrophysicist studying the structure and dynamics of galaxies — including a rare double-ringed elliptical galaxy she discovered — to help us understand how they form and evolve.


Faith Osier
Faith Osier (Kenya | Germany)
Infectious disease doctor
Scientist studying how humans acquire immunity to malaria, translating her research into new, highly effective malaria vaccines.


In “Birth of a Nation” (2015), artist Paul Rucker recast Ku Klux Klan robes in vibrant, contemporary fabrics like spandex, Kente cloth, camouflage and white satin – a reminder that the horrors of slavery and the Jim Crow South still define the contours of American life today. (Photo: Raymond Stevenson)

Paul Rucker
Paul Rucker (USA)
Visual artist + cellist
Multidisciplinary artist exploring issues related to mass incarceration, racially motivated violence, police brutality and the continuing impact of slavery in the US.


Kaitlyn Sadtler
Kaitlyn Sadtler (USA)
Regenerative tissue engineer
Tissue engineer harnessing the body’s natural immune system to create new regenerative medicines that mend muscle and more quickly heal wounds.


DeAndrea Salvador (USA)
Environmental justice advocate
Sustainability expert and founder of RETI, a nonprofit that advocates for inclusive clean-energy policies that help low-income families access cutting-edge technology to reduce their energy costs.


Harbor seal patient Bogey gets a checkup at the Marine Mammal Center in California. Veterinarian Claire Simeone studies marine mammals like harbor seals to understand how the health of animals, humans and our oceans are interrelated. (Photo: Ingrid Overgard / The Marine Mammal Center)

Claire Simeone
Claire Simeone (USA)
Marine mammal veterinarian
Veterinarian and conservationist studying how the health of marine mammals, such as sea lions and dolphins, informs and influences both human and ocean health.


Kotchakorn Voraakhom
Kotchakorn Voraakhom (Thailand)
Urban landscape architect
Landscape architect and founder of Landprocess, a Bangkok-based design firm building public green spaces and green infrastructure to increase urban resilience and protect vulnerable communities from climate change.


Mikhail Zygar
Mikhail Zygar (Russia)
Journalist + historian
Journalist covering contemporary and historical Russia and founder of Project1917, a digital documentary project that narrates the 1917 Russian Revolution in an effort to contextualize modern-day Russian issues.


TED2018 Senior Fellows

Senior Fellows embody the spirit of the TED Fellows program. They attend four additional TED events, mentor new Fellows and continue to share their remarkable work with the TED community.

Prosanta Chakrabarty
Prosanta Chakrabarty (USA)
Ichthyologist
Evolutionary biologist and natural historian researching and discovering fish around the world in an effort to understand fundamental aspects of biological diversity.


Aziza Chaouni
Aziza Chaouni (Morocco)
Architect
Civil engineer and architect creating sustainable built environments in the developing world, particularly in the deserts of the Middle East.


Shohini Ghose
Shohini Ghose (Canada)
Quantum physicist + educator
Theoretical physicist developing quantum computers and novel protocols like teleportation, and an advocate for equity, diversity and inclusion in science.


A pair of shrimpfish collected in Tanzanian mangroves by ichthyologist Prosanta Chakrabarty and his colleagues this past year. They may represent an unknown population or even a new species of these unusual fishes, which swim head down among aquatic plants.

Zena el Khalil
Zena el Khalil (Lebanon)
Artist + cultural activist
Artist and cultural activist using visual art, site-specific installation, performance and ritual to explore and heal the war-torn history of Lebanon and other global sites of trauma.


Bektour Iskender
Bektour Iskender (Kyrgyzstan)
Independent news publisher
Co-founder of Kloop, an NGO and leading news publication in Kyrgyzstan, committed to freedom of speech and training young journalists to cover politics and investigate corruption.


Mitchell Jackson
Mitchell Jackson (USA)
Writer + filmmaker
Writer exploring race, masculinity, the criminal justice system, and family relationships through fiction, essays and documentary film.


Jessica Ladd
Jessica Ladd (USA)
Sexual health technologist
Founder and CEO of Callisto, a nonprofit organization developing technology to combat sexual assault and harassment on campus and beyond.


Jorge Mañes Rubio
Jorge Mañes Rubio (Spain)
Artist
Artist investigating overlooked places on our planet and beyond, creating artworks that reimagine and revive these sites through photography, site-specific installation and sculpture.


An asteroid impact is the only natural disaster we have the technology to prevent, but since prevention takes time, we must search for near-Earth asteroids now. Astronomer Carrie Nugent does just that, discovering and studying asteroids like this one. (Illustration: Tim Pyle and Robert Hurt / NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Carrie Nugent (USA)
Asteroid hunter
Astronomer using machine learning to discover and study near-Earth asteroids, our smallest and most numerous cosmic neighbors.


David Sengeh
David Sengeh (Sierra Leone + South Africa)
Biomechatronics engineer
Research scientist designing and deploying new healthcare technologies, including artificial intelligence, to cure and fight disease in Africa.

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What’s the definition of feminism? 12 talks that explain it to you

Image courtesy Backbone Campaign. License CC BY 2.0

Earlier this month, Merriam-Webster announced that 2017’s word of the year is feminism. Searches for the word on the dictionary website spiked throughout the year, beginning in January around the Women’s March, again after Kellyanne Conway said in an interview that she didn’t consider herself a feminist, and during some of feminism’s many pop culture moments this year. And the steady stream of #MeToo news stories have kept the word active in search over the past few weeks and months.

It’s not surprising, really. Think of it as one of the outcomes of the current moral crisis in the US and around the world — along with a growing awareness of the scope of the global epidemic of sexual harassment and acts of violence against women, the continuing challenges of underrepresentation in all decision-making positions and the misrepresentation of women and girls in media. I believe this moment presents an opportunity to enlist more women and men to step forward as feminists, to join the drive toward a world in which women feel safe at work and home and enjoy freedom to pursue their dreams and their potential for themselves, their families, communities and countries.

Still, I hear every day the question: “What does feminism actually mean?” According to Merriam-Webster, it’s “the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes” and “organized activity on behalf of women’s rights and interests.”

That’s a good elevator pitch, but it could use more perspective, more context. Over my seven years as curator and host of the TEDWomen conference, we’ve seen more than a few TED Talks take up the subject of feminism from many angles. Here are a dozen, chosen from the more than 150 TEDWomen talks published on TED.com and the TED Archive YouTube channels so far — including a bonus talk from the TEDx archive that kicked off a global conversation.

Looking ahead to 2018, I hope these talks can inform how we channel the new awareness and activism of 2017 into strategic decisions for women’s rights. Could we eliminate the gender gap in leadership? Could we eliminate economic, racial, cultural and gender inequities? Imagine these as goals for a newly energized and focused global feminist community.

1. Courtney Martin: Reinventing feminism

What does it mean to be a millennial and a feminist in the 21st century? In her first TEDWomen talk, Courtney Martin admits that when she was younger, she didn’t claim the feminist label because it reminded her too much of her hippie mom and outdated notions of what it means to be a feminist. But in college, she changed her mind. Her feminism, she says, looks and sounds different from her mom’s version, but it’s not all that different underneath: feminist activism is on a continuum. While her mother talks about the patriarchy, Courtney talks about intersectionality and the ways that many other issues, such as racism and immigration, are part of the feminist equation. Blogging at Feministing.com, she says, is the 21st-century version of consciousness-raising.

2. Hanna Rosin: New data on the rise of women

Back in 2010 when we held the very first TEDWomen event in Washington, DC, one of our presenters was journalist Hanna Rosin. At the time, she was working on a book that came out in 2012 titled The End of Men. Her talk focused on a particular aspect of her research: how women were outpacing men in important aspects of American life, without even really trying. For instance, she found that for every two men who get a college degree, three women will do the same. Women, for the first time that year, became the majority of the American workforce. “The 200,000-year period in which men have been top dog,” she said, “is truly coming to an end, believe it or not.”

3. Kimberlé Crenshaw: The urgency of intersectionality

Now more than ever, it’s important to look boldly at the reality of race and gender bias — and understand how the two can combine to create even more harm. Kimberlé Crenshaw uses the term “intersectionality” to describe this phenomenon; as she says, if you’re standing in the path of multiple forms of exclusion, you’re likely to get hit by both. In this moving and informative talk, she calls on us to bear witness to the reality of intersectionality and speak up for everyone dealing with prejudice.

4. Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

At the first TEDWomen in 2010, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg looked at why a smaller percentage of women than men reach the top of their professions — and offered three powerful pieces of advice to women aiming for the C-suite. Her talk was the genesis of a book you may have heard of: Lean In came out in 2013. In December of that year, we invited Sheryl to come back and talk about the revolution she sparked with Lean In. Onstage, Sheryl admitted to me that she was terrified to step onto the TED stage in 2010 — because she was going to talk, for the first time, about the lonely experience of being a woman in the top tiers of business. Millions of views (and a best-selling book) later, the Facebook COO talked about the reaction to her idea (watch video), and explored the ways that women still struggle with success.

5. Roxane Gay: Confessions of a bad feminist

Writer Roxane Gay says that calling herself a bad feminist started out as an inside joke and became “sort of a thing.” In her 2015 TEDWomen talk, she chronicles her own journey to becoming a feminist and cautions that we need to take into account all the differences — “different bodies, gender expressions, faiths, sexualities, class backgrounds, abilities, and so much more” — that affect us, at the same time we account for what we, as women, have in common. Sometimes she isn’t a perfect feminist — but as she puts it: “I would rather be a bad feminist than no feminist at all.”

6. Alaa Murabit: What my religion really says about women

Alaa Murabit champions women’s participation in peace processes and conflict mediation. As a young Muslim woman, she is proud of her faith. But when she was a teenager, she realized that her religion (like most others) was dominated by men, who controlled the messaging and the policies created in their likeness. “Until we can change the system entirely,” she says, “we can’t realistically expect to have full economic and political participation of women.” She talks about the work she did in Libya to change religious messaging and to provide an alternative narrative which promoted the rights of women there.

7. Madeleine Albright: Being a woman and a diplomat

Former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright talks bluntly about being a powerful women in politics and the great advantage she feels in being a woman diplomat — because, as she puts it, “women are a lot better at personal relationships.” She talks about why, as a feminist, she believes that “societies are better off when women are politically and economically empowered.” She says she really dedicated herself to that, both at the UN and then as secretary of state. Far from being a soft issue, she says, women’s issues are often the very hardest ones, dealing directly with life and death.

8. Halla Tómasdóttir: It’s time for women to run for office

In early 2016, Halla Tómasdóttir ran for president in Iceland and — surprising her entire nation (and herself) — she nearly won. Tómasdóttir believes that if you’re going to change things, you have to do it from the inside. Earlier in her career, she infused the world of finance with “feminine values,” which she says helped her survive the financial meltdown in Iceland. In her 2016 TEDWomen talk, she talks about her campaign and how she overcame media bias, changed the tone of the political debate and inspired the next generation of future women leaders along the way. “What we see, we can be,” she says. “It matters that women run.”

9. Sandi Toksvig: A political party for women’s equity

Women’s equality won’t just happen, says British comedian and activist Sandi Toksvig, not unless more women are put in positions of power. In a very funny, very smart TEDWomen talk (she is the host of QI after all), Toksvig tells the story of how she helped start a new political party in Britain, the Women’s Equality Party, with the express purpose of putting equality on the ballot. Now she hopes people — and especially women — around the world (US women, are you listening?) will copy her party’s model and mobilize for equality.

10. Chinaka Hodge: “What Will You Tell Your Daughters About 2016?”

Poet, playwright, filmmaker and educator Chinaka Hodge uses her own life and experiences as the backbone of wildly creative, powerful works. In this incredible poem delivered before the 2016 election — that is perhaps even more stirring today given everything that has passed in 2017 — she asks the tough questions about a year that none of us will forget.

11. Gretchen Carlson on being fierce

In this #MeToo moment, Gretchen Carlson, the author of Be Fierce, talks about what needs to happen next. “Breaking news,” she says, “the untold story about women and sexual harassment in the workplace is that women just want a safe, welcoming and harass-free environment. That’s it.”  Ninety-eight percent of United States corporations already have sexual harassment training policies. But clearly, that’s not working. We need to turn bystanders into allies, outlaw arbitration clauses, and create spaces where women feel empowered and confident to speak up when they are not respected.

Bonus: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: We should all be feminists

This TEDx talk started a worldwide conversation about feminism. In 2012 at TEDxEuston, writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie explains why everyone — men and women — should be feminists. She talks about how men and women go through life with different experiences that are gendered — and because of that, they often have trouble understanding how the other can’t see what seems so self-evident. It’s a point even more relevant in the wake of this year’s #MeToo movement. “That many men do not actively think about gender or notice gender is part of the problem of gender,” Nigozi Adichie says. “Gender matters. Men and women experience the world differently. Gender colors the way we experience the world. But we can change that.”

As I mentioned, these are just a handful of the amazing, inspiring, thoughtful and smart women and the many ideas worth spreading, especially in these times when hope and innovative ideas are so necessary.

Happy 2018. Let’s make it a good one for women and for all us who proudly call ourselves feminists and stand ready to put ideas into actions.

— Pat

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