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A personal plea for humanity at the US-Mexico border | Juan Enriquez

In this powerful, personal talk, author and academic Juan Enriquez shares stories from inside the immigration crisis at the US-Mexico border, bringing this often-abstract debate back down to earth — and showing what you can do every day to create a sense of belonging for immigrants. “This isn’t about kids and borders,” he says. “It’s about us. This is about who we are, who we the people are, as a nation and as individuals.”

The transformative power of video games | Herman Narula

A full third of the world’s population — 2.6 billion people — play video games, plugging into massive networks of interaction that have opened up opportunities well beyond entertainment. In a talk about the future of the medium, entrepreneur Herman Narula makes the case for a new understanding of gaming — one that includes the power to create new worlds, connect people and shape the economy.

How we're helping local reporters turn important stories into national news | Gangadhar Patil

Local reporters are on the front lines of important stories, but their work often goes unnoticed by national and international news outlets. TED Fellow and journalist Gangadhar Patil is working to change that. In this quick talk, he shows how he’s connecting grassroots reporters in India with major news outlets worldwide — and helping elevate and expose stories that might never get covered otherwise.

A radical plan to end plastic waste | Andrew Forrest

Plastic is an incredible substance for the economy — and the worst substance possible for the environment, says entrepreneur Andrew Forrest. In a conversation meant to spark debate, Forrest and head of TED Chris Anderson discuss an ambitious plan to get the world’s biggest companies to fund an environmental revolution — and transition industry towards getting all of its plastic from recycled materials, not from fossil fuels.

Reducing corruption takes a specific kind of investment | Efosa Ojomo

Traditional thinking on corruption goes like this: if you put good laws in place and enforce them well, then economic development increases and corruption falls. In reality, we have the equation backwards, says innovation researcher Efosa Ojomo. In this compelling talk, he offers new thinking on how we could potentially eliminate corruption worldwide by focusing on one thing: scarcity. “Societies don’t develop because they’ve reduced corruption,” he says. “They’re able to reduce corruption because they’ve developed.”